This site is optimised for modern browsers. For the best experience, please use Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, or Microsoft Edge.

Spotlight: Research Delivery Manager Frances Doyle

Spotlight: Research Delivery Manager Frances Doyle

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) CRN South London Research Delivery Manager Frances Doyle talks about her passion for supporting innovation in clinical trials, as well as what she is most looking forward to doing once the COVID-19 restrictions have been lifted.

The aim of this monthly spotlight blog series is to celebrate, highlight, educate and inform the public about the diverse range of people who support vital research studies from within our region. We are proud of everyone who plays their part in contributing to improving the health of the population.

What do you do?

I am one of the Research Delivery Managers for the Network, and my role involves supporting clinical trials into cancer. I manage a team who works flexibly across the region to ensure that studies are delivered to time and target. My work also involves trying to embed a culture of continuous improvement and innovation in research via training, mentoring people and through supporting projects that result in efficiency savings or that improve the patient research experience.

How would you describe yourself?

I am a people person who enjoys working collaboratively with others in a team environment and that is why I found myself drawn to working in the NHS.

Why did you join CRN South London?

The south London region has a reputation for delivering world leading research, and it is exciting to be able to play my part in supporting the scientific community in bringing new innovations and discoveries directly to patients. I joined the Network from CRN North West London in January 2019.

What are you interested in?

My interests include meeting up with friends, going on long walks and reading plenty of books. After the COVID-19 restrictions have been lifted, I am particularly looking forward to being able to visit London’s theatres and art galleries again.

Why are you involved in research?

I’ve been interested in science since my school days and my passion for supporting the collective effort to push the boundaries of knowledge in healthcare has never waned. Clinical research is an exciting field to work in and I wouldn’t do anything else.

Why is research important?

Research is important because it helps to improve the standard of care we give to our patients via the improved diagnosis of diseases, as well as through the discovery of new drugs and treatments, which will hopefully lead to them having a better quality of life. I’d encourage anyone who is interested in taking part in research to visit the NIHR’s Be Part of Research website.